Our Work

The Transition Accelerator is aimed at delivering major, scalable system transitions to harness social and economic disruption to build viable transition pathways to a net-zero future. Our work identifies and advances only those transitions that are compelling, capable, and credible.

Latest

Report: Autonomous Vehicles, Parking & the Real  Estate Sector

Report: Autonomous Vehicles, Parking & the Real Estate Sector

Vol. 3, Iss. 4 (Oct 2021)
Layzell D, Stout M, Leary J, Stone C

For the past 100 years, the automobile, especially personally owned vehicles, have greatly impacted the design of our cities and how we live in them. However, Canada’s personal mobility systems are poised to be radically transformed by the convergence of four disruptive technology and business model innovations: vehicle automation, connectivity, electrification and car sharing. Together, these innovations enable Autonomous Mobility-on-Demand (AMoD), whereby fleets of autonomous, connected and driverless vehicles will pick up and drop off passengers, effectively replacing the need for personal vehicle ownership, while providing a more convenient, safer and lower cost service.

Report: Hydrogen: An Overview – Eastern Canada

Report: Hydrogen: An Overview – Eastern Canada

Vol. 3, Iss. 3 (Aug 2021)
Hoornweg D, Wotten D, Kauling D, Jianu O, Armouldi E

SECTION 1 Thirty-six hydrogen-focused businesses identified through industry discussions, were surveyed for their perspectives on opportunities, challenges and progress in expanding the ‘hydrogen economy’. Fifteen of these companies provided detailed discussions on their current operations. SECTION 2 outlines active research programs in hydrogen production (25 research institutions), storage (16 institutions), and hydrogen utilization (13 institutions).

Report: Thinking about the future of autonomous vehicles

Report: Thinking about the future of autonomous vehicles

Vol. 3, Iss. 2 (Apr 2021)
Roberts C, Meadowcroft J

This report explores whether we should support the rapid introduction of autonomous vehicles in the hope that they will unlock changes in the mobility system that facilitate more low-carbon travel or be more cautious on the ground that they might make things worse.